Corewood Care Blog

Here at Corewood Care, your comfort and wellbeing is our priority.

New to Care Management? How a Care Manager Works with Clients and their Families

Corewood's Care Management team works with clients and their families on a wide variety of issues, health conditions, and family dynamics. You may not know about all we do, so please let me provide a brief overview of the most noteworthy tasks we undertake.

Determining Where an Older Adult Should Live

Every family's situation is different. Some older adult clients are temporarily immobilized due to a fall or hospitalization, or one spouse has a condition that will worsen over time, such as Alzheimer's. Can the spouse or caregiver help with bathing and dressing? Does the older adult need constant supervision or someone to check in on them occasionally?  The answers to all of these questions – and many more – will need to be taken into consideration when deciding where an older adult will live. Care Managers are trained to look for warning signs to determine if an older adult is safe living at home alone. Whether or not an older adult remains at home, there are concerns that the Care Manager will review to ensure safety.

  • Making a Home Safe - If an older adult is going to remain in at home, a Care Manager can recommend modifications to make the home safer.
  • Finding Senior Housing - If an older adult can no longer live independently, a Care Manager can assist with a move to a senior housing facility, such as assisted living or CCRC. Throughout the process, a Care Manager will evaluate a community based on the level of care a person needs now and in the future as well as consider their lifestyle.

Covering Your Legal Bases

If you, your spouse, or your parent were suddenly incapacitated, who has the legal authority to act on their behalf? A Care Manager works with older adults and their families to avoid legal red tape and make sure older adults have the right legal documents in place. They will recommend and work with an attorney to be sure there is a power of attorney, advance care directives, a will, and, if needed, guardianship.

Organizing Finances

Would you know what to do if you suddenly had to take over managing money and paying bills for your spouse or parents? Care Managers work with older adults and their families to be sure trusted individuals know where the essential paperwork is kept and how to access funds if need be. Care Managers also work with older adults to review long-term care insurance to help cover the cost for care as well as help them determine their eligibility Medicare, Medicaid, or Veteran's Assistance.

Managing Medical Care

Care Managers are often first called when there is a medical crisis. Care Managers are an older adult's front line advocates who know the medical system, know the older adult, and can help provide the best care. Before a crisis occurs, a Care Manager knows an older adult's full medical history, record all of the prescription medications, and have attended doctor visits with an older adult in the past. They know how to ask questions and bring up concerns with a doctor and can summarize and take notes of the encounter to be discussed afterward with all interested parties.

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Preparing for a Pandemic and a Future Wave This Winter

StockSnap_PEDYBK5W3R2 Quarantine and Virus Scrabble Game

Officials at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have warned that this fall we will most likely experience a second wave of COVID-19. Many health officials are suggesting that Americans prepare over the summer for the potential of widespread illness and more stay at home orders.

In case of an outbreak, what can older adults do to protect themselves and their families?

Here are recommendations for how to prepare now to be ready for another outbreak.

1.    What should I buy now to prepare?

The US Department of Homeland Security, before a pandemic strikes, to store a two-week supply of water and food, as well as over-the-counter medications you tend to take.

Items to consider stocking up on for your pantry:

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Meditation for Older Adults

For many families and their loved ones, COVID-19 has not only brought on fears of health, safety, and physical wellbeing, but it also has negatively impacted current living arrangements and relationships among families and loved ones. For older adults, living alone has become even more burdensome as social visits, fitness and exercise, physical therapy visits, and limitations to healthy food options has been limited if not non-existent. Families that have taken on caregiving duties for their loved ones have been experiencing increased anxiety, tension, and a decline in personal health. Meditation during this time has become more important for older adults, their families, and caregivers during this time.

Research supports the many benefits meditation can bring. Meditation can help memory, cognitive abilities, anxiety, stress, loneliness, depression, circulation, and digestion to name a few. The website U.S. News Health section support these benefits. You can visit the website here U.S. News: Health

Below are a few tips for first time meditators and beginners as well as different meditation techniques to try. Meditation can be an activity done at home alone or even virtually with your loved one. Start slow, 5 minutes, and build your way up to 15 minutes a day. The more you practice the easier meditation will become and the more beneficial it will be to your overall health.

The Basics

  1. Schedule 5 to 15 minutes of your day when you will not be distracted by others, phone calls, or other distracting noises. Think of meditation as a “daily vitamin” that you need to take for your health and let others in your household know you are going to meditate and cannot be bothered at this time. It is important for others in your household to appreciate and understand this time is important for you.
  2. Get comfortable. Either lay down or sit where your body feels relaxed. You do not need to be in the quintessential meditation poses if your body feels relaxed and comfortable then you are ready for meditation.
  3. Close your eyes and breathe! Breathe in deeply through your nostrils, filling your stomach with air, to the count of four. If able, hold for a count of four and then release your breath through your mouth to the count of 8. This may take some time to work up to. The idea of meditation is to clear your mind. Focusing on this breathing technique prevents any daydreaming and wandering of thought. Again, the more you practice meditation the more you can clear your mind easily and prevent your thoughts from wandering. Do not be frustrated with many different thoughts coming and going and the complete ability to stop them. This is natural. Just go back to focusing on your breathing and the repetition of the breathing technique
  4. Slowly open your eyes after your meditation has ended. It is also important to slowly move your body from the position you are in. Like waking from a deep night’s rest, let your body adjust back to the external stimulus.


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What to Know Before Moving Parents from a Senior Community into Your Home During COVID-19

Moving from community Woman and caregiver in senior community

Throughout the DMV, senior communities are entering the fourth week of insulating their residents to protect them from COVID 19, and family members physically cut off from their loved ones are increasingly worried about their care and mental health.

While most geriatric professionals and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) urge the public not to panic and say it is unwise to bring loved ones home, many families are weighing the risk of a COVID 19 outbreak along with the impact that long-term isolation will have on their loved ones. They also worry that a frail older adult may not have the ability to fight COVID 19 and are seriously considering bringing them home.

At Corewood Care Management, we believe the decision to bring an older adult home is as individual as you and your parent. While we would not discourage a family from bringing a relative home from a senior community, it is critical to think about whether you’re prepared to provide the care that they need.

To help think through your choices, here are ten things to consider as you weigh the options of moving a parent out of their senior community and into your home.

  1. Have a conversation with your parents, learn their thoughts and wishes. Can they make an informed decision, do they share your concerns about COVID-19?

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Thanks for sharing this article with us. I would like to add more to this. Elderly people should avoid nonessential doctor consult... Read More
Tuesday, 30 June 2020 06:12
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7 Helpful Answers About COVID-19

healthcare-blocks-pi_20200408-165542_1 building blocks of healthcare

As the COVID-19 pandemic escalates, we are reminded repeatedly on what preventative measures to take. Social isolation, holding a 6-foot distance from others, and proper hand washing to name a few. However, like many I know, I have also wondered about other preventative measures to take in the new way of living we are all experiencing. Below are some tips that I have found helpful while isolating at home.

  1. Can the virus spread on paper or cardboard?

Many of us are using Amazon and Instacart as well as other delivery services for groceries and items to avoid in-person visits. We know the virus can spread through physical contact and through mucous membranes (eyes, mouth, nose), but what about other surfaces? The length of time the virus stays on surfaces does vary, however, the risk is of obtaining COVID-19 through commercial goods or packages is low, per the CDC.

  1. Can my pet transmit COVID-19 to me?

You may have heard the recent news of the Tiger at the Bronx Zoo testing positive for COVID-19. The tiger showed symptoms consistent to the virus. Animals and our domestic friends have been an important topic at hand as it relates to the virus. Many want to know if animals can transmit the virus to humans and vice versa. As it stands now, these reports and studies have concluded that animals can contract the virus from humans, however it does not appear that humans can contract the virus from animals.

  1. What do I do if I don’t have an N-95 mask?

N95 Face masks are nearly impossible to find and if you do find them, it’s possible they are counterfeit. The N95 masks filter 95% of airborne particles. It is important to note that the masks are mainly to help persons wearing the masks to not transmit their germs to others. The importance of the mask diminishes once touched and should be removed and replaced with a new mask. Healthcare workers need these masks and are most knowledgeable on how to appropriately and safely wear them. Let’s leave the N95 masks for them and make our own. Below is a great video recently posted by the Surgeon General on how to make a face mask at home. Good rule of thumb is to make sure the fabric blocks out the sunlight from coming through. If you do reuse your mask, fold it inwards to prevent the outside from touching other surfaces and place in a sealable bag.

Link to Video:

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COVID-19 and Social Isolation

woman_alone_socialisolatio_20200401-170454_1 Woman sitting alone socially isolated

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the new norm has been social distancing and, more recently encouraged, complete social isolation. As we well know, older adults are already a population that is vulnerable to social isolation. Prior to the virus, 60% of older adults over 75 years of age experience loneliness and social isolation. It can be expected that many of our older adults are experiencing significant increases in depression, declining physical health and wellbeing, and possibly an increase in dementia.

Here are some ways in which we can help our isolated older adults feel connected given the limitations on in-person socialization.

  1. Local Village Networks

Villages are local neighborhoods offering educational, emotional, social support and much more for older adults living at home. Non-profit village networks are an excellent resource for our older adults living at home.

To find your local village, the website https://www.wavevillages.org/index.php/about-us/our-villages can help.

  1. Technology

Facetime, Zoom conferencing, Audiobooks etc. are just a few ways for families to socialize with loved ones. Hoopla is an application that requires a library card number to gain access to a large database of audiobooks, e-books, and even movies. During this time, it is especially important for families to be taking part in Facetime/Skype/or Zoom to socialize with their loved one at home. For fitness, many applications are free and some are offering free exercise classes and mediation classes virtually. For older adults having trouble with technology, GrandPad is an easier device to navigate. Digital Library Cards can be obtained online at https://mcpl.link/DigitalCard, and can be exchanged at any MCPL branch for a full-service library card once branches reopen.

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Healthy Food Options

Fruits-and-Vegetables Fruits and Vegetables

Are you tired of your unhealthy eating habits?

Do you want to become a healthier person?

We’ve got a list of healthy food options for you!

  1. Fruits

We all know the health benefits of fruits. They are rich in vitamins and great for our health. So if you’re looking to eat healthily,  try any of the following fruits:

  • Apples
  • Strawberries
  • Avocados
  • Lemons
  • Pineapples
  • Blackberries
  • Grapefruit
  • Pears
  • Oranges
  • Bananas
  1. Eggs

Eggs are among the most nutritious foods because they are rich in nutrients like betaine that promote heart health. Eggs are also a great source of high-quality protein with the most protein found in the egg white. Egg whites contain vitamin B2 and are rich in selenium, vitamin D, B12, B6, and minerals like zinc and iron.

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I really loved reading your blog. It was very well authored and easy to undertand. Three Links... Read More
Thursday, 20 February 2020 04:16
Guest — Geetha
Wow, this is whole lot of information about healthy food habits. Thank you for sharing this. Love to follow them. It is tough cal... Read More
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Home Safety – Preparing For the Winter

House-during-winter bungalow during a cold winter day, snowy weather

Winter storms and cold weather can be dangerous, so it’s important to plan and prepare for the winter. Here are a few steps you can take to stay safe during the winter:

  1. Winter-Proof Your Home
  • Install weather stripping, storm windows, and insulation.
  • Insulate water lines running along exterior walls.
  • Clean out the gutters.
  1. Check Your Heating Systems
  • Get your heating system serviced professionally, making sure it’s clean, ventilated, and works properly.
  • Inspect and clean chimneys and fireplaces to prevent carbon monoxide (CO) emergencies.
  • Install a smoke detector or replace batteries that should last the winter
  • Have a safe alternate heating source available.
  1. Stock Up on Food

Essential supplies like food and water need to be kept stocked in case of a blizzard or some storm that makes it dangerous to step outside for a while.

  1. Watch for Water Issues on the Roof

Check the roof for the following problems:

  • Excess snowfall
  • Icy Gutters
  • Icicles
  1. Prepare for Possible Power Outages

You are more likely to experience a power outage during the winter season. With icy conditions and heavy snowfall, power lines get affected, and power outages become common. Stock up on flashlights and batteries and be sure to have nonperishable food items stocked in your pantry.

  1. Keep a Fire Extinguisher At Home

It is important to have a fire extinguisher in the house at all times, especially during the winter. During the colder months, you may use items that you only utilize during the winter, such as the fireplace, a space heater, and a gas stove.  In the unfortunate circumstance of something going wrong and a fire starting, you should have a fire extinguisher on-hand and ready to use.

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nice
Wednesday, 05 August 2020 10:37
Guest — gutter fixing
I am so happy I found your blog on and I absolutely love your information about home safety preparing for the winter! I liked and ... Read More
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Use Holiday Visits to Assess Senior Well-Being

Older-adult-reading-a-book-at-home

The holidays allow family members of all generations to see how one another is doing and whether anyone may need help or encouragement during this time.

If you are visiting a parent or senior loved one over the holidays, you can also use your visit as an opportunity to assess their well-being.

  1. Emotional State

Keep an eye out for changes in your loved one’s moods and behavior. You can’t always gauge someone’s emotional state over the telephone, even if you speak to them every day. Look for signs of depression and anxiety, including withdrawal from social activities, changes in sleep patterns, loss of interest in hobbies, and changes in basic home maintenance and personal hygiene. The latter can be an indicator of dementia or other physical ailments like dehydration, which often happens to elders in the winter months and can be serious. If you notice sudden odd behavior in your loved one, such as confusion or agitation, be sure to seek medical attention. These are common symptoms of a urinary tract infection (UTI), which is prevalent in seniors and easily resolved with antibiotics.

  1. Weight Loss

One of the most obvious signs of bad health, both physical and mental, is weight loss. Possible causes of noticeable weight loss could be cancer, depression, or dementia. Certain medications and aging, in general, can also change the way food tastes and/or result in a loss of appetite. If weight loss is evident, talk to your loved one about your concerns and schedule a doctor’s appointment to address the issue.

  1. Balance and Mobility

Pay close attention to the way your loved one moves and how they walk. A reluctance to walk, changes in gait or obvious pain during movement can be a sign of joint, muscle, or neurological problems. If your loved one is unsteady on their feet, they may be at risk of falling, which can cause severe injury or worse. If you notice changes in their mobility and coordination, make an appointment with their doctor to discuss options to keep them safe and mobile, such as pain management, physical therapy, and mobility aids.

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Thanks for sharing such a knowledge article. I am glad to know about some of the unique points in your blog which is very useful. ... Read More
Friday, 13 December 2019 05:42
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Halloween Activities for Older Adults

Two-Pumpkins Two glowing Halloween pumpkins on black background

Halloween isn’t just for kids. It’s a great excuse for seniors to dress up, do some spooky crafts, and, of course, eat goodies. Here are five activities your senior loved ones can enjoy:

  1. Movie Nights.

What’s Halloween without a spooky movie? Here are some of our favorites that are fun for all ages:

  • Hocus Pocus: a light-hearted comedy about witches seeking revenge, featuring Bette Midler.
  • Casper: based on the comic book character, this movie is about a ghost who wants to make friends.
  • The Witches: a humorous movie about outsmarting an evil witch, played by Angelica Houston, and her plan to turn all children into mice.
  1. Spooky Photos

Photo props are great for creating fun memories. Pull together old clothes and accessories or create your props using craft sticks and paper. Use them at a Halloween family gathering and take lots of photos to cherish for years to come. 

  1. Halloween Snacks

There are a lot of other snacks to enjoy apart from the candy. For a senior-friendly take on candy apples, make or buy caramel apple dip and serve with sliced apples. Create a sweet and salty snack by mixing candy corn with either popcorn or peanuts. 

  1. Make a Mask

There is no need for a full costume when seniors can be just as festive in a simple mask. It’s easy to make your own with a plain masquerade mask and craft supplies like feathers, rhinestones, and glitter. Have your senior parent wear the mask on Halloween night to surprise their grandkids or unexpecting trick-or-treaters.

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Tips on How to Boost Memory

Brain diagram in human head

Everyone has moments of forgetfulness from time to time, especially when life gets busy.

While this can be a completely normal occurrence, having a poor memory can be frustrating.

Genetics plays a role in memory loss, especially in serious neurological conditions like Alzheimer’s disease. However, research has shown that diet and lifestyle have a major impact on memory too.

Here are several evidence-based ways to improve your memory naturally.

  1. Have Food Known to Improve Memory
  • Avocado
  • Berries
  • Almonds
  • Coconut Oil
  • Olive Oil
  • Cold-Water, Fatty Fish
  • Green Leafy Vegetables
  • Dark Chocolate
  • Eggs
  • Green Tea
  • Fermented Foods
  • Sea Vegetables
  • Turmeric
  • Walnuts
  1. Avoid Sugar

Eating too much added sugar has been linked to many health issues and chronic diseases, including cognitive decline.

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Fall Prevention Awareness Week

an-elderly-coupe-walking

Among older adults, falling is the leading cause of trauma, injury, or even death. Falls can take a toll on older adults quality of life and independence.

Fall Prevention Awareness Week September 23rd – 29th.

We’ll examine, the seriousness of falls along with ways to reduce the risk of falling.

While age increases the risk of falling, other factors such as chronic disease and vision loss also contribute to falls. Below are several ways of preventing or minimizing the risk of falling.

  1. Regular Exercise and Activity

Regular exercise and activity help promote muscle strength and balance, thus lessening the risk of falling.  It's also good for overall physical and mental health.

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When is it Time to Hire Home Care Services?

Nurse-taking-care-of-older-adult An older adult being cared for by a nurse

Home care services can be a good solution for older adults who want to maintain their independence, but  who need help with their medical procedures or day to day living. Every situation is different, but there are a few signs that may indicate it’s time to hire a home health aide.

  1. Balance Issues

Does your loved one walk in an unsteady manner that worries you? Do they experience pain while sitting or walking? If they do, they may be at risk of falling. So it’s best to hire help to them get around.

The inability to stand for long periods can make many aspects of home life more difficult. It can be hard to do basic chores like sweeping, vacuuming, or cooking. Home elder care will help with everyday chores and housekeeping. They will also help plan and cook nutritious meals, follow dietary guidelines, and keep track of intake if it is necessary for medical care. This can take a significant burden  from seniors  who have difficulty walking or standing.

  1. Forgetfulness

Although mild forgetfulness is a common part of aging, chronic forgetfulness is a problem. If you are worried about your loved one’s memory, then you might need to consult a doctor. A home health aide supports the senior deal with memory lapses, reducing the impact of memory loss.

  1. Missed Medication

With age comes more medications. As the number of medications increases, it can be difficult to keep track of what to take when and what might interact. One of the leading causes of ER visits in older adults is medication interaction, so it’s important to take these issues seriously. If you or a loved one is having a hard time keeping track, a home health aide can help keep records and make sure that all medications are taken at the correct time. Home care services can also include checking vital signs and mental state for conditions that require continuous monitoring.

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It's good to know that you should consider a home care service if you have a loved one who has balancing problems. My uncle has a ... Read More
Wednesday, 18 September 2019 15:32
Guest — Darrien Hansen
It makes sense that you should hire a professional if your elderly loved one experiencing issues with maintaining their balance. M... Read More
Monday, 14 October 2019 18:44
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Summer Safety Tips for Older Adults

Elderly-pretty-woman-in-sun-hat-enjoys-summer-vacation-in-a-sea-voyage-on-a-pleasure-boat.-She-sits-on-the-upper-dec_20190723-125728_1

Summertime is a time for fun and leisure; but for seniors, the heat and sun can be dangerous without proper precautions. Many older adults have conditions such as asthma, thyroid disease, and high blood pressure or heart problems that require some preparations to avoid overexposure to the sun. Here are some great tips that aging adults can use to make sure they have a fun and safe summer.

  1. Stay Hydrated

Seniors are more susceptible to dehydration than younger people because they lose their ability to conserve water as they age. They can also become less aware of their thirst and have difficulty adjusting to temperature changes. So it’s important to drink water often. Aim to have about 6 to 8 glasses of water a day. Try to avoid caffeine and alcohol or anything that could dehydrate your system.

  1. Apply Sunscreen & Wear a Hat

Before going outside, apply sunscreen and put on a hat. Seniors especially need the extra sun protection to help keep them healthy. It’s also a good idea to gently remind loved ones about re-applying sunscreen every few hours.

  1. Wear Loose Fitting Clothes

As a general rule, the best fabrics for warm weather are lightweight and made from natural materials such as cotton or linen. Natural fabrics offer more comfort than synthetic fibers. Stock your summer wardrobe with light-colored and loose-fitting clothes to help feel cooler and more comfortable.

  1. Protect your Eyes

Vision loss can be common among seniors, and too much exposure to the sun can irritate eyes and cause further damage. Wearing sunglasses can protect your eyes from harmful UV rays and preserve your vision. Sunglasses can also slow the development of wrinkles around your eyes, delay the onset of cataracts, protect against glaucoma-related light sensitivity, and shield you from distracting glare while you drive.

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Guest — Senior Advice
hi your post is fantastic with a lot of useful information. Thank you for your guidance. Keep sharing.
Monday, 05 August 2019 12:19
Guest — Cassidy woods
Thanks for sharing content loaded with great information with us. I'll bookmark your site for future read.
Wednesday, 14 August 2019 13:40
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Summer Activities for Older Adults

Older-Adults-Swimming Seniors swimming and smiling in the ocean

The weather is getting hotter, making it the perfect time of year to enjoy spending time outdoors. If you’ve reached retirement age, the old summer tradition of visiting an amusement park to ride the roller coasters is probably no longer your cup of tea. If it is, more power to you; keep riding those coasters until you can’t take it anymore. If you’re like most seniors, though, you’re probably looking for something a bit more mellow. Read on for ten fun summer activities.

  1. Going to a Musem

Many museums offer discounted tickets for seniors, so don’t miss your chance to take advantage of these money-saving opportunities. Tour an art or natural history museum in your area, or look for something a bit out of the ordinary. Museums are popping up all over the country with focuses on niche interests, like collectibles, specific points in history, particular regions and more. A quick internet search can reveal a plethora of opportunities in your area, with some just a short train or bus ride away.

  1. Fishing 

Fishing is a relaxing activity that appeals to older adults. Seniors might enjoy spending time with old friends or a grandchild. Seniors can go to local fishing spots during the early morning hours or in the evening—basically when temperatures are not too intense. 

  1. Attending Local Outdoor Events 

Weekly outdoor events are becoming popular in many communities. Some places offer concerts, which give seniors a chance to hear their favorite songs, while others feature live plays or outdoor movies weekly. These outdoor events tend to take place in the evenings when it’s cooler.

  1. Bird Watching

Invest in a bird feeder and you can enjoy many hours of bird watching. This can be a more in-depth activity if you borrow books from a local library and identify the various birds you see. A pair of binoculars can be useful in seeing further and could help with vision issues.

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Diet and How it Can Help Your Memory

brian-food

Even though a plate of fries and a beef burger sound delicious, you might want to know this before you order: what we eat has a high chance of affecting our memory.

Research has shown that the probability of developing dementia and having poor memory is linked to the consumption of saturated fat. Saturated fat increases blood and cholesterol levels, which speeds up the formation of beta-amyloid plaque in the brain. This plaque damages the brain and causes Alzheimer’s.

Confused about what to have for lunch now? Here is a list of foods you can have, which will also boost your memory.

Fish

Salmon, mackerel, tuna and other fish are linked to lower levels of beta-amyloid proteins in the blood and are, therefore, good for health. Further, eating fish, rich in omega-3 fatty acids, is crucial in the proper functioning of neurons.

Salads

Having salads does not only keep your body in shape, but also your mind. Martha Clara Morris, director of the section on nutrition in the Department of Internal medicine at Rush University, clarifies that salads make for a good diet as they are high in Vitamin E.  This potent vitamin helps in the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease by protecting nerve cells.  

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Guest — David Thompson
Very Useful Tips! I'll surely give them a try. Thanks a lot and Keep Sharing.
Thursday, 28 March 2019 13:05
Guest — David Thompson
Very Useful Tips! I'll surely give them a try. Thanks a lot and Keep Sharing.
Thursday, 28 March 2019 13:12
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When to Use a Care Manager

Feeling confused about when to hire a Care Manager? We’ve compiled a list of situations when hiring a Care Manager would be beneficial:

1.     When you want to save money

Many people believe that engaging the services of a Care Manager is expensive and beyond their reach. This is often a short-sighted view. Hiring a Care Manager can often save money. Yes, the initial cost may be high and often not covered by insurance, but a Care Manager can help you avoid costly mistakes.

Care Managers know the medical system, senior living communities, and local specialists better than any other senior resource.  Recommendations by a Care Manager, who are usually trained as a social worker or are a registered nurse,  can save you from making uninformed and hasty decisions. They can also assist in developing plans for future care and act as an honest agent of communication between the power of attorney, financial planner and elder law attorney.

2.     When you’re confused about services

Trying to find the right care for an older adult can be confusing. Good news – there are a lot of choices out there. Bad news – there are a lot of choices out here. Hiring a Care Manager to navigate through these unchartered waters is indispensable. A Care Manager knows their local resources, a company’s reputation, and cost factors. If staying within a certain budget or remaining within a specific insurance plan is important, a Care Manager can guide you through all your options.

3.     What specialist to choose?

If a specialist, new primary care physician, or alternative treatments are on the table, a Care Manager can provide recommendations about local experts. It’s important to recognize that a Care Manager is working on your behalf. They receive no compensation from an outside source. They work for you and are looking out for your wellbeing. Thus, Care Managers can recommend a specialist for a particular treatment. They can also attend the doctor’s meeting with you, and they can help you communicate with your healthcare professional.

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How to Care for Your Aging Parents

Many adult children return home for the holidays and notice for the first time that their aging parents are not able to do as many things as they previously could perform. Often they notice the house is no longer well kept, the outdoor garden is overgrown, and old family friends have moved away. As older adults age in place here is four useful tips for helping to maintain health, wellness, and social connections.

1-    Stay in contact

Isolation causes depression,  a major factor in the declining health of older adults. As we age, it is critical to remain engaged and connected to the outside world. Thus remain connected to your older adult. Call once or twice a week and check in. Many older adults suffer through a sense of loss as they age. Thus, hearing a familiar voice on a regular basis can help them realize that they are not alone and others care for them.

2-    Visit in person

Calling and talking on the phone can never replace an in-person visit. A visit can help put a smile on your loved one’s face, and it enables you to determine how they are doing. It may be difficult to visit regularly,  but try to schedule quality time with them as they need you. If you can only see them once or twice a year, try communicating using video call platforms like Skype and FaceTime. While these applications are not as meaningful as an in-person visit, they offer the potential for connections and will be appreciated by your loved one.

3-    Hire a caregiver

Caregiver companionship is another option to consider for older adults who live alone, especially those who are homebound because of frailty or dementia. Companion care is primarily emotional support and companionship for seniors who are generally healthy and who want to remain independent at home. Most importantly, companions function as an extra set of hands, eyes, and feet to the person you care for when you can't be there. Companions can assist with meal preparation, light housekeeping, laundry, grocery shopping, and errands. Companions provide valuable social benefits, decreasing isolation and improving the quality of life. Warm relationships are often formed when a consistent companion is on the job -- a boon for both the companion and the older adult.

However, do not let the presence of a caregiver Companion take your place. It means the world to older adults when young people visit them.

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Guest — David Thompson
I really appreciate your thoughts, because providing care to aging parents is a major issue faced by new generation. The main prob... Read More
Thursday, 11 April 2019 06:37
Guest — Cassidy Woods
As our parents get older, they may begin to move more slowly or forget what they are doing. Depending on the state of the health, ... Read More
Wednesday, 17 April 2019 07:07
Guest — Cassidy Woods
As our parents get older, they may begin to move more slowly or forget what they are doing. Depending on the state of the health, ... Read More
Wednesday, 17 April 2019 07:52
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Traits of the Best Caregivers

A caregiver is responsible for the health and happiness of our loved ones. Hence, it is essential to find the most suitable caregiver for them. How do you know who is a good caregiver? When evaluating caregivers, look for the following traits:

Compassionate

While selecting caregivers, it is essential to ensure that they are compassionate. Compassion maintains and sustains a bond between the patient and the caregiver. It also enables caregivers to put themselves in the patient’s shoes and understand what they are going through. Empathizing with the elderly can help ease their discomfort.

Patient

As the elderly grow older, their bodies and minds work slower than they used to. They forget things easily and need to be reminded of even daily chores, repeatedly. For this reason, caregivers must be patient, so that they remain calm and collected while taking care of your loved one. Being patient means that they will understand if things do not go as quickly as planned and if the patient is being stubborn.

Attentive and responsive to situations

It is crucial for a good caregiver to be attentive. An elderly patient needs constant care and attention. It is the caregiver’s job to continuously monitor, and recognize the needs of the patient, even if he/she cannot communicate them.

The caregiver also needs to pay close attention to early warning signs and observe any change in skin color, appetite, physical condition, and behavior. Sometimes, the patient is unaware that they need help and the caregiver, noticing the signs, must respond to them immediately.

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Guest — Steele Honda
Thanks for pointing out that while selecting caregivers it is essential to ensure that they are compassionate. My sisters and I ar... Read More
Monday, 05 August 2019 22:18
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How to Improve Your Memory as You Age

We all tend to forget things. And as we grow older, we all start to notice some changes in our ability to remember things. For example, you’re peering into your refrigerator and can’t remember why. Or you are unable to recall a familiar name or place during a conversation. Memory lapses can happen at any age, but we often become overly concerned as we get older because we worry they may be signs of dementia or loss of intellectual function.

According to the Harvard Medical School, significant memory loss in older people isn't a normal part of aging—but is due to organic disorders, brain injury, or neurological illness, with Alzheimer's being among the most feared.

Even though forgetting is common and normal, and most fleeting memory issues that we experience with age reflect normal changes in the structure and function of the brain. With decades of research, there are various strategies we can use to protect and sharpen our minds. Here are a few to try.

Keep Learning

Just as physical activity keeps your body healthy, mentally stimulating activities can help your brain stay in shape. Experts think that continuous learning and education can help keep memory strong by getting a person into the habit of being mentally active. Challenging your brain with mental exercise is believed to activate processes that help maintain individual brain cells and stimulate communication. Many of us have jobs that keep them mentally active, but pursuing a hobby or learning a new skill can function the same way. Read; join a book club; play mahjong or bridge; research your family history; do crossword or jigsaw puzzles; pursue music or art; design a new garden layout. Building and preserving brain connections is an ongoing process, so make lifelong learning a priority.

Stay Physically Active

Maintain a balance between mental and physical exercises. Physical exercises increase oxygen to your brain and decrease the risk of memory loss diseases like diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Physical exercise also plays a crucial role in neuroplasticity, which ensures new neural connections. Thus it is important to engage in aerobics, light yoga or other exercises to help keep the brain’s neurons firing.

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