Preparing for a Pandemic and a Future Wave This Winter

StockSnap_PEDYBK5W3R2 Quarantine and Virus Scrabble Game

Officials at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have warned that this fall we will most likely experience a second wave of COVID-19. Many health officials are suggesting that Americans prepare over the summer for the potential of widespread illness and more stay at home orders.

In case of an outbreak, what can older adults do to protect themselves and their families?

Here are recommendations for how to prepare now to be ready for another outbreak.

1.    What should I buy now to prepare?

The US Department of Homeland Security, before a pandemic strikes, to store a two-week supply of water and food, as well as over-the-counter medications you tend to take.

Items to consider stocking up on for your pantry:

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Meditation for Older Adults

For many families and their loved ones, COVID-19 has not only brought on fears of health, safety, and physical wellbeing, but it also has negatively impacted current living arrangements and relationships among families and loved ones. For older adults, living alone has become even more burdensome as social visits, fitness and exercise, physical therapy visits, and limitations to healthy food options has been limited if not non-existent. Families that have taken on caregiving duties for their loved ones have been experiencing increased anxiety, tension, and a decline in personal health. Meditation during this time has become more important for older adults, their families, and caregivers during this time.

Research supports the many benefits meditation can bring. Meditation can help memory, cognitive abilities, anxiety, stress, loneliness, depression, circulation, and digestion to name a few. The website U.S. News Health section support these benefits. You can visit the website here U.S. News: Health

Below are a few tips for first time meditators and beginners as well as different meditation techniques to try. Meditation can be an activity done at home alone or even virtually with your loved one. Start slow, 5 minutes, and build your way up to 15 minutes a day. The more you practice the easier meditation will become and the more beneficial it will be to your overall health.

The Basics

  1. Schedule 5 to 15 minutes of your day when you will not be distracted by others, phone calls, or other distracting noises. Think of meditation as a “daily vitamin” that you need to take for your health and let others in your household know you are going to meditate and cannot be bothered at this time. It is important for others in your household to appreciate and understand this time is important for you.
  2. Get comfortable. Either lay down or sit where your body feels relaxed. You do not need to be in the quintessential meditation poses if your body feels relaxed and comfortable then you are ready for meditation.
  3. Close your eyes and breathe! Breathe in deeply through your nostrils, filling your stomach with air, to the count of four. If able, hold for a count of four and then release your breath through your mouth to the count of 8. This may take some time to work up to. The idea of meditation is to clear your mind. Focusing on this breathing technique prevents any daydreaming and wandering of thought. Again, the more you practice meditation the more you can clear your mind easily and prevent your thoughts from wandering. Do not be frustrated with many different thoughts coming and going and the complete ability to stop them. This is natural. Just go back to focusing on your breathing and the repetition of the breathing technique
  4. Slowly open your eyes after your meditation has ended. It is also important to slowly move your body from the position you are in. Like waking from a deep night’s rest, let your body adjust back to the external stimulus.


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What to Know Before Moving Parents from a Senior Community into Your Home During COVID-19

Moving from community Woman and caregiver in senior community

Throughout the DMV, senior communities are entering the fourth week of insulating their residents to protect them from COVID 19, and family members physically cut off from their loved ones are increasingly worried about their care and mental health.

While most geriatric professionals and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) urge the public not to panic and say it is unwise to bring loved ones home, many families are weighing the risk of a COVID 19 outbreak along with the impact that long-term isolation will have on their loved ones. They also worry that a frail older adult may not have the ability to fight COVID 19 and are seriously considering bringing them home.

At Corewood Care Management, we believe the decision to bring an older adult home is as individual as you and your parent. While we would not discourage a family from bringing a relative home from a senior community, it is critical to think about whether you’re prepared to provide the care that they need.

To help think through your choices, here are ten things to consider as you weigh the options of moving a parent out of their senior community and into your home.

  1. Have a conversation with your parents, learn their thoughts and wishes. Can they make an informed decision, do they share your concerns about COVID-19?

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Guest — Cassidy Woods
Thanks for sharing this article with us. I would like to add more to this. Elderly people should avoid nonessential doctor consult... Read More
Tuesday, 30 June 2020 06:12
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7 Helpful Answers About COVID-19

healthcare-blocks-pi_20200408-165542_1 building blocks of healthcare

As the COVID-19 pandemic escalates, we are reminded repeatedly on what preventative measures to take. Social isolation, holding a 6-foot distance from others, and proper hand washing to name a few. However, like many I know, I have also wondered about other preventative measures to take in the new way of living we are all experiencing. Below are some tips that I have found helpful while isolating at home.

  1. Can the virus spread on paper or cardboard?

Many of us are using Amazon and Instacart as well as other delivery services for groceries and items to avoid in-person visits. We know the virus can spread through physical contact and through mucous membranes (eyes, mouth, nose), but what about other surfaces? The length of time the virus stays on surfaces does vary, however, the risk is of obtaining COVID-19 through commercial goods or packages is low, per the CDC.

  1. Can my pet transmit COVID-19 to me?

You may have heard the recent news of the Tiger at the Bronx Zoo testing positive for COVID-19. The tiger showed symptoms consistent to the virus. Animals and our domestic friends have been an important topic at hand as it relates to the virus. Many want to know if animals can transmit the virus to humans and vice versa. As it stands now, these reports and studies have concluded that animals can contract the virus from humans, however it does not appear that humans can contract the virus from animals.

  1. What do I do if I don’t have an N-95 mask?

N95 Face masks are nearly impossible to find and if you do find them, it’s possible they are counterfeit. The N95 masks filter 95% of airborne particles. It is important to note that the masks are mainly to help persons wearing the masks to not transmit their germs to others. The importance of the mask diminishes once touched and should be removed and replaced with a new mask. Healthcare workers need these masks and are most knowledgeable on how to appropriately and safely wear them. Let’s leave the N95 masks for them and make our own. Below is a great video recently posted by the Surgeon General on how to make a face mask at home. Good rule of thumb is to make sure the fabric blocks out the sunlight from coming through. If you do reuse your mask, fold it inwards to prevent the outside from touching other surfaces and place in a sealable bag.

Link to Video:

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COVID-19 and Social Isolation

woman_alone_socialisolatio_20200401-170454_1 Woman sitting alone socially isolated

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the new norm has been social distancing and, more recently encouraged, complete social isolation. As we well know, older adults are already a population that is vulnerable to social isolation. Prior to the virus, 60% of older adults over 75 years of age experience loneliness and social isolation. It can be expected that many of our older adults are experiencing significant increases in depression, declining physical health and wellbeing, and possibly an increase in dementia.

Here are some ways in which we can help our isolated older adults feel connected given the limitations on in-person socialization.

  1. Local Village Networks

Villages are local neighborhoods offering educational, emotional, social support and much more for older adults living at home. Non-profit village networks are an excellent resource for our older adults living at home.

To find your local village, the website https://www.wavevillages.org/index.php/about-us/our-villages can help.

  1. Technology

Facetime, Zoom conferencing, Audiobooks etc. are just a few ways for families to socialize with loved ones. Hoopla is an application that requires a library card number to gain access to a large database of audiobooks, e-books, and even movies. During this time, it is especially important for families to be taking part in Facetime/Skype/or Zoom to socialize with their loved one at home. For fitness, many applications are free and some are offering free exercise classes and mediation classes virtually. For older adults having trouble with technology, GrandPad is an easier device to navigate. Digital Library Cards can be obtained online at https://mcpl.link/DigitalCard, and can be exchanged at any MCPL branch for a full-service library card once branches reopen.

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Corewood Care Blog
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Suite 700
Bethesda MD 20816

(301) 909-8117

Licensed by the MD Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of Healthcare Quality as a Residential Service Agency License # R2911.

Licensed by the DC Dept. of Health as a Home Support Agency, License # HSA-0002 and as a Nurse Staffing Agency, License # NSA-0468.

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